TRAVAUX À L’AVEUGLE

RENÉE LAVAILLANTE

TRAVAUX À L’AVEUGLE

  • Exhibition
© Renée Lavaillante, Exhibition "Travaux à l'aveugle", Galerie B-312, 2002.
12 October 2002 to 9 November 2002

Galerie B-312 is pleased to welcome three large-scale works by Renée Lavaillante :Travaux à l’aveugle II, Qui sait comment toucher le sol et Travaux à l’aveugle III. -Travaux à l'aveugle II consists of nine drawings on inlaid paper with fragments of plants where, with her eyes closed, the artist draws with dry pencil the roughnesses that she spotted by touch. Qui sait comment toucher le sol gathers drawings on Herculene paper where the artist has drawn loops with a reed stick to the tip of which she had fixed a grease pencil. The reed was long enough to allow the artist to stand upright and straight with both feet on the side edges of the leaf placed on the ground. Travaux à l'aveugle III brings together fifteen drawings in which the artist drew in dry pencil the route of the walkers in the Parc de Pourtalès in Strasbourg. Before starting, she took care, each time, to transform a sheet of paper measuring 50 by 65 centimetres into a map of the park by embossing a certain number of markers on it, by means of which she would locate the walker on the map, and thus be able to draw his or her walk without taking his or her eyes off it. Renée Lavaillante thus accomplishes a methodical return to a practice of drawing that takes into account the beneficial outrage of the proponents of Automatism, when they invoked both the absence of drawing and full responsibility for the result. It is at least on the horizon of such a context that we can understand the artist's choice to work by projects, where the constraints allow him to provoke traces, apparently random, but which paradoxically prove to be remarkably precise about the course of the process, about the contingencies encountered and about the structures that the different materials used imposed from the outset on their users. As a result, Renée Lavaillante lets be, between eye and hand, a work that is not an accomplished achievement, a finished result, a resolved question, but a solitary undertaking, that is to say unique and singular, a work of filiation that is both contrary to the modern concept of rupture and its postmodern opposite of hybridity.

—Translated from a text by Jean-Émile Verdier