Point de fusion

SYLVIE READMAN

Point de fusion

  • Exhibition
5 September 2003 to 11 October 2003

Gallery B-312 hosts in its main room Point de fusion , an exhibition of the latest work of photographer Sylvie Readman. The exhibition includes eleven photographs divided into five works: Launched, Correspondence, Disfigurement, Consonances and Obviousness.- In today's field of art, photography is either practiced or used. In either case, the artist runs the risk of either unconsciously spreading the insidious ideology of a "photographic vision" (a single point of view and discrimination of information through selective framing), or of submitting to an artistic practice that falls under the imperative of escaping from the "photographic vision" by proceeding to a proper critique of such a "vision". But here again, there is a risk of reducing the practice of art to the strict practice of criticism. These are roughly the broad outlines of the debate through which discourses attempt to theorize an artistic practice of photography.-Sylvie Readman was able to escape the academicism of such a debate by specifying her field of work from the outset. Photography is a process of mechanical replication that unfolds in a very precise time interval. Between the moment the shutter opens and closes, an image duplicates what the photographer has seen through the viewfinder. Sylvie Readman overturns this rule by giving herself another one: Between the first click and the final image, the artist allows herself to take other shots without rearming the camera, and in the interval between two shots, she gives herself the right to move while keeping the same point of view, or more radically she will change it and thus superimpose different motifs, or even more radically she will apply determined rotations to the camera without changing the point of view while giving herself very precise reference points. -The composition of the motifs, the images, their arrangement, their texture, the choice to print them on rag paper from an inkjet printer, remains. All these decisions have to be evaluated since the renewal that Sylvie Readman has been applying to photography. For example, one has to experience the extreme preciseness that Sylvie Readman obtains in the smallest details of the images while the whole appears to be driven by a desire for immateriality and fluidity to understand how the most obvious consequence of such renewal is the possibility of a coexistence of specifically photographic textures, such as sharpness and blur, which discourses on photography have become accustomed to oppose in support of their theories of the photographic.

—Translated from a text by Jean-Émile Verdier