Free space Loss

ERIKA LINCOLN

Free space Loss

  • Exhibition
© Erika Lincoln, Free Space Loss, 2010, Galerie B-312 —Photo: Galerie B-312

Originally from Manitoba, Erika Lincoln lives and works in Winnipeg. After studying history and philosophy, she graduated from the University of Manitoba in 1999 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. She has exhibited at the Video Pool (2007, Winnipeg) where she completed a residency in 2004 and at the Ace Art Gallery (2003, Winnipeg). She has participated in numerous group exhibitions and festivals including the Stuttgarter Filmwinter Festival for Expanded Media (2010 and 2009, Germany), Medialab Prado (2009, Madrid, Spain), the Pixxelpoint Festival (2007, Nova Gorica, Slovenia) and The Robot Talent Show (2005, Dublin, Ireland). In 2011, she will present Singing Condition at the Winnipeg Art Gallery (Manitoba).

19 March 2010 to 17 April 2010

—Opening Friday 19 March, 2010 at 5 PM

Galerie B-312 is very pleased to present Free Space Loss by Erika Lincoln, a 2009 work that will be unequivocally described as virtual reality. -Virtual reality is a reality that exists only through our senses. It is deceived as they are by a device capable of subjecting them to excitations similar to those they would experience if they were subjected to the actual experience of an equally effective reality. Virtual reality does not exist outside such a device - In Free Space Loss, Erika Lincoln works to reconstruct, in a very homemade way, what might seem to be the necessary conditions that would allow us to experience virtual reality. To do this, she makes four pieces of equipment consisting of an old motorcycle helmet, a full-face helmet, with a small opaque canvas tunnel as a visor, the bottom of which is a liquid crystal screen. The helmet is equipped with sensors that detect the temperature and brightness in the tunnel. In Free Space Loss, Erika Lincoln doesn't try to make us experience reality, when it is virtual, but rather she works on deconstructing virtuality, when we think it is valid for reality.

 

—Summary of a text by JEAN-ÉMILE VERDIER